ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday November 19, 2012 | Update
 
|
share
|
ECONOMY

Growing imports show the failure of Venezuela's agrarian model

In 2012, more money (107.3%) was required to bring more food into the country

According to the National Statistics Institute (INE), imports jumped from USD 1,47 billion in January-July 2011 to 3.06 billion during the same period in 2012 (File photo)
ANGIE CONTRERAS C. |  EL UNIVERSAL
Monday November 19, 2012  02:15 PM
Transforming Venezuela into a large agriculture producer across Latin America has been one of the unfulfilled promises of President Hugo Chávez ever since he took office in 1999. After 14 years, agriculture is still underdeveloped. In fact, it is among the goals and provisions for the next six-year term.

The president has placed special emphasis on the need to recover lands good for agriculture and "democratize" prices by fighting against large estates to guarantee land's efficiency and enhance production. It all aims at self-sufficiency, import substitution, and food export.

However, over the last 14 years, imports of agriculture raw materials and food itself have shot up whereas domestic production continues falling year after year.
Venezuela's oil boom has allowed the Government to keep its massive import policy to meet food domestic demand and, therefore, fill the gaps in domestic production.

However, expenditure skyrockets as imports are paid for at historically high prices.

According to the National Statistics Institute (INE), imports jumped from USD 1.47 billion in January-July 2011 to 3.06 billion during the same period in 2012. In other words, in 2012, more money (107.3%) has been needed to bring more food into the country.

acontreras@eluniversal.com

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
Is protest over?

That political protest in Venezuela has lost momentum seems pretty obvious: people are no longer building barricades to block off streets near Plaza Francia in Altamira (eastern Caracas), an anti-government stronghold; no new images have been shown of brave and dashing protesters with bandanna-covered faces clashing with the National Guard in San Cristóbal, in the western state of Táchira; and those who dreamed of a horde of "Gochos" (Tachirans) descending  in an avalanche to stir up revolt in Caracas have been left with no option but to wake up to reality.

fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
Alianzas
fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
cerrar