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CHÁVEZ'S HEALTH | He resorted to the people's will

Ruling party leader: Venezuelan opposition wrong about January 10

Venezuelan Congress Speaker Diosdado Cabello(TV screen capture)
EL UNIVERSAL
Monday December 24, 2012  12:15 PM

Referring to Hugo Chávez possibility of not being able to be sworn in as reelected president next January 10, ruling party PSUV's Vice-President Diosdado Cabello urged the Venezuelan opposition not to see hope to lead the country. Cabelo also advised dissidents to thoroughly read the Constitution, particularly Article 231. "You are wrong, absolutely wrong. You will not attain power that way," admonished PSUV's leader during the sworn-in ceremony of Bolívar state governor-elect Francisco Rangel Gómez.

The vice-president noted, "Do not expect that the National Assembly's speaker will take office; you will not attain power that way; no, you are not. This is neither legal nor constitutional. It is not what the people decided on October 7 (presidential election). Said people chose Hugo Chávez as president and the will of the people must be respected. It is right there were they make the people get confused. They believe they will be able to manipulate our National Armed Forces (FAN). Read the article very well. Unlike February 27, Today Venezuelans claim their rights. They continue attacking the revolutionary forces (...) forget about January 10 if you have any hope concerning that date. If the president is not in the country, the National Assembly's speaker will not take the presidential seat, unless President Chávez orders so. However, that will not be the date you should set on your calendar. Read in detail Article (230) and keep your feet on the ground."

Cabello recalled the message for unity given by President Hugo Chávez to the Armed Force and the revolutionary forces before he left for Cuba. "The president is very cautious. We are faithful and hopeful that he will recover."

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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Living with HIV/AIDS (II)

At first she agreed that I use her real name, that she had no problems with that at all. After all, living with HIV had driven her to help others – as a workshop facilitator giving talks and conducting seminars, or as a volunteer for local AIDS Service Organizations like Acción Solidaria (Solidary Action) and Mujeres Unidas por la Salud (Women United for Health, or Musa), a support group network for HIV-positive women. But when we were well into the interview, the realization that she might lose her private health insurance coverage made her change her mind.

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