ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Friday February 15, 2013 | Update
 
|
share
|
CHÁVEZ'S HEALTH

Communication minister: Chávez breathes through a tracheal cannula

Venezuela's Information and Communication Minister Ernesto Villegas explained that President Hugo Chávez was put on assisted breathing due to lingering respiratory distress. After 68 days of absence, photos showing the president and his daughters reading the Granma daily newspaper edition of February 14, 2013 were published on Friday

The pictures of the president and his two daughters taken on February 14 were disclosed by Science and Technology Minister Jorge Arreaza (Photo: AP)
EL UNIVERSAL
Friday February 15, 2013  11:31 AM
Venezuelan Information and Communication Minister Ernesto Villegas said Friday in an official statement that Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez is currently breathing through a tracheal cannula due to lingering respiratory distress.

"The respiratory infection that emerged during the post-operative stage was controlled, but some degree of respiratory distress remains. Given this circumstance, which is being treated accordingly, Commander Chávez is currently breathing through a tracheal cannula, which temporarily hinders his speech," explained Villegas.

"The medical team is administering a rigorous treatment to deal with the base disease, which is not exempt from complications. The patient cooperates with the treatment and rehab in close coordination with the medical team in charge," the minister added.   

Villegas said that Chávez "is conscious, with full intellectual functions, and in close communication with his cabinet."

Additionally, photos of Chávez along with his daughters and reading the Granma newspaper edition of February 14 were published during a brief nationwide mandatory radio and television broadcast. The official statement came 68 days after the Venezuelan president left for Cuba to undergo surgery.

The pictures were disclosed by Science and Technology Minister Jorge Arreaza, who is Chávez's son-in-law.

Arreaza stressed that the post-surgery images would bring "calm" to the Venezuelan people and supplement the medical report provided.

Twitter: @ocarinaespinoza

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
Living with HIV/AIDS (II)

At first she agreed that I use her real name, that she had no problems with that at all. After all, living with HIV had driven her to help others – as a workshop facilitator giving talks and conducting seminars, or as a volunteer for local AIDS Service Organizations like Acción Solidaria (Solidary Action) and Mujeres Unidas por la Salud (Women United for Health, or Musa), a support group network for HIV-positive women. But when we were well into the interview, the realization that she might lose her private health insurance coverage made her change her mind.

fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
Alianzas
fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
cerrar